Though I started performing magic when I was a little kid and became a professional magician at the Magic Castle when I was 14 years old, the transition to full-time corporate magician for hire was a more recent decision.

I’m very fortunate to perform nationwide and have a host of top corporate clients that I’ve grown to know over the course of repeat corporate events. My routines and approach to performing have both shifted from that of a magician at the Magic Castle, to a corporate magician for events in boardrooms and banquet halls. My routines are much more streamlined and versatile and less theatrical. I’ve designed much of my show to be customizable to each individual audience, often incorporating the company brand message as well as key audience members, such as the CEO, investors, etc.

Though I am a Los Angeles magician for hire, I am often on the road performing in San Diego, San Francisco, Atlanta, New York, Miami, and other cities throughout the country. The challenge of being a magician for hire who travels with his show, is that my act has to pack small but play to a large audience. Designing routines and whole acts to fit into a small briefcase is difficult, but the limitations also inspire creativity. And I enjoy performing for new people in new cities every week.

I also visit colleagues–magicians in San Diego to magicians in New York–and talk to them about their clients and thoughts on performing. Working with other corporate magicians is a great way to expand my understanding of performing as a magician—we’re always learning…

On a social note, life as a corporate magician does have its drawbacks. Aside from performing, my day-to-day life is rather solitary. I do work with other magicians and consult on projects and shows, but for the most part I am practicing, responding to emails, etc. by myself. My assistant even works remotely. Occasionally I think about shifting from a corporate magician for hire to a full-time consultant or other magic related job that has a more traditional social dynamic. But then I realize I’d have to set an alarm and think otherwise.